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  • October 6th, 2009

    The First Fall Classic: The Red Sox, The Giants, and the Cast of Players, Pugs, and Politicos who reinvented the World Series in 1912
    by Mike Vaccaro

    Posted by Christine E. at 5:22 pm in Baseball,Book Reviews,Red Sox Comments (7)

    So, as we wait for the Red Sox to start their postseason journey either tomorrow or the next day, I knew I would need something to occupy my time–and what better than a book about the Red Sox and the 1912 World Series? Thankfully, the good folks at Doubleday sent along a copy of The First Fall Classic.

    Written by New York Post sportswriter Mike Vaccaro, the book chronicles the trials and tribulations of the 1912 World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Giants.

    This was a magical time, when legendsThe 1st Fall Classic Book Cover like Christy Mathewson, Smokey Joe Wood, and Tris Speaker played the game, and vastly different than today’s baseball–The salaries ranged from about $1,500 to $15,000 a year and most baseball players had other jobs in the off-season. A tie game was also a perfectly acceptable to end a contest, with games often being halted due to darkness…

    Lead by irascible and completely quirky Manager John J. McGraw, (whole books could be written about HIS exploits!) The New York Giants took on Manager Jake Stahl and the Boston Red Sox, (who were nicknamed “the Speed Boys” back then) for eight long and crazy games–think of the 2004 ALCS–times 5. Where anything could happen–more often than not, did.

    Extremely well researched and written, The First Fall Classic is perfect book for a student of the game, or anyone looking for a great TRUE baseball story–you won’t be disappointed. You can pick it up at any bookstore, or order it online Check it out!

    Coming up: The decision of who is playing the Yankees, and when, will be decided tonight–within an hour after the Twins and the Tigers fight it out for the Central Division in tonight’s tie breaker. The expected outcome is that the Yankees will play tomorrow, with the Sox/Angels series beginning on Thursday at 9:37pm–but we’ll see….

    7 Responses to “The First Fall Classic: The Red Sox, The Giants, and the Cast of Players, Pugs, and Politicos who reinvented the World Series in 1912
    by Mike Vaccaro”

    1. Cardinal70 says:

      I’m almost done with my copy as well. It’s a heck of a read, much more so than I expected when I first picked it up!

    2. CW says:

      I found the book very interesting as well. He managed to make Red Sox fans look sympathetic…

      I’m a Yankees fan, clearly, btw.

    3. * Bits and pieces « Ron Kaplan’s Baseball Bookshelf says:

      […] BostonRedThoughts reviews Mike Vaccaro’s compelling The First Fall Classic. Upshot: “Extremely well researched and written, The First Fall Classic is perfect book for a student of the game, or anyone looking for a great TRUE baseball story….” Jeff Frier’s interview with Vaccaro appear’s on BleacerReport.com. […]

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